one. The contract of sale should not be an agreement of sale, but should only give an option to purchase to the tenant, because if, as part of a purchase agreement, a person acquires ownership of the goods and the tenant obtains the property under the lease agreement in such a way that he obtains the property, he could take from any person who is for sale the goods or pledges for sale, give little without notice of the lease agreement [See section 30(2) of the sale of goods Act, 1930 and therefore the tenant would be able to defeat the owner`s intention. However, if the contract is not a purchase agreement, but the tenant simply has the opportunity to purchase under certain conditions, the tenant cannot give anyone a valid property. [Roopchand Jankidas v. National Bank, 46 Cal. 342]. . . .